tomewing

Our friends in Iran

tomewing:

dayan:

Again, I’m not talking about the freedom of speech stuff here. Nobody seems particularly interested in abrogating that. I’m talking about where do you get a fucking tank. Low-level problems. It’s not an accident that in the military, they call what they do “logistics.” So much of it is just the process of moving and manipulating machinery and infrastructure - the guns and soldiers and MREs are the minor, inconsequential figures in all this, the replaceable parts, the consumables. You want to make a movie with a realistic-looking gun, it can be done. Go to the dollar store and see for yourself. Get a black non-Sharpie-brand Sharpie if you don’t like the orange barrel. 

But if you want an aircraft carrier?

This is a REALLY GOOD post about (broadly) logistics and the potential chilling effects of authenticity. Read it all!

It got me thinking about 2 minor things:

- Old DOCTOR WHO story The Sea Devils, which is the one where the Royal Navy gets to fight the monsters and there are lots of close-ups of Navy destroyers, diving bells etc. From the perspective of early 70s Who this creates something of a break from the norm because the Navy have to be shown as a competent fighting force instead of the usual “bullets won’t stop them!” crew. (To balance things out there is a REALLY awful Man From The Ministry - another DW cliche) But the gap in presentation between the actual naval equipment and standard BBC effects makes the whole thing seem a bit ridiculous too.

- I wonder if there’s a role for GAMES - and CGI in general - to counteract the chilling effect described, since obviously the “how do you get an Aircraft Carrier?” question is fairly moot there. (How do you get permission for this bunch of polygons to look like a real US Aircraft Carrier? is also a question but not necessarily that pressing a one?? IDK all the games I actually PLAY are about charming cartoon monsters) Obviously at the moment games have their own narrative and tonal and thematic straitjackets but these at least aren’t straitjackets put on them by the necessity of having to go and ask the army “Can we borrow a plane please?”

Another way to get around this is doing stories that aren’t rooted in realism—science fiction and the more fantastic end of the superhero genre. Like, you don’t need to ask SHIELD for permission to use the Helicarrier. (On the other hand, as far as the Marvel movies go, there’s also the related issue of being vetted by the Chinese government to film in China, one of the reasons I’m uneasy about Iron Man 3.)

Really this is just one of the many reasons why realism is a terrible idea. And also why comics is the best medium, since you don’t need to worry about those issues there.

agreeablecomics
agreeablecomics:

Splash Page, Godzilla: King Of The Monsters #1, Marvel ComicsArt by Herb Trimpe and Frank Giacoia

The beginning of Marvel’s Godzilla series, which was actually set in the Marvel Universe. Over the course of the series Godzilla takes on SHIELD, the Champions, the Fantastic Four (after being shrunk down) and Devil Dinosaur but not, regrettably, the Micronauts. (Because if you’re doing the Increidble Shrinking Godzilla in the Marvel Universe, you should really go the whole hog and send it to the Microverse at some point.)

agreeablecomics:

Splash Page, Godzilla: King Of The Monsters #1, Marvel Comics
Art by Herb Trimpe and Frank Giacoia

The beginning of Marvel’s Godzilla series, which was actually set in the Marvel Universe. Over the course of the series Godzilla takes on SHIELD, the Champions, the Fantastic Four (after being shrunk down) and Devil Dinosaur but not, regrettably, the Micronauts. (Because if you’re doing the Increidble Shrinking Godzilla in the Marvel Universe, you should really go the whole hog and send it to the Microverse at some point.)

copperbadge

copperbadge:

eimearkuopio:

tehnakki:

thisisevenharderthannamingablog:

nottonyharrison:

ladyironofshield:

#this strikes me as ‘joss think’s he’s writing a super clever line but in reality he doesn’t know the existing canon as well as he thinks’ 

But he’s not wrong! S.H.I.E.L.D. has had two different meanings before this one, so they likely had to work to come up with something that would work.

Someone really wanted their initials to spell out S.H.I.E.L.D.

Did it have a second meaning in the MCU?  If it did then I stand corrected.  I get that it could just be an intentionally meta line, but it feels a bit clunky to me regardless.

No other (what’s the opposite of acronym?) in the MCU, but since that’s pretty much what I thought when I first heard it spelled out, I can’t really knock ‘em for the line. 

This is the country that came up with the USA PATRIOT Act (Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism, after all. 

I thought this line was very astute. My company has won multi-million dollar contracts for (what we think is) having a better name/acronym then other teams.  We are supposed to spend up to 3 hours thinking up a good name/backronym (we call it backronyming, when you start with a word you want, i.e. SHIELD, and then work backwards to words that make sense as part of the acronym) on a proposal.  Which, considering we only have 30 hours allotted for each proposal we write, is a significant chunk of change.

I’m not even going to discuss the acronym for the project I did my PhD in, but yes, this.

I believe this is something every comics fan has thought at one point or another, IDK about movie fans. The original acronym in the comics was “Supreme Headquarters, International Espionage, Law-Enforcement Division” which CLEARLY existed to spell out SHIELD because it makes very little sense otherwise.

SUPREME HEADQUARTERS.

The MCU version is the third version of the word combination and is actually the most rational of the three. The MCU also has the most logical implicit backstory, which is that SHIELD was founded by people who wanted to carry on Captain America’s legacy.

I will bet dollars to wingnuts that Howard Stark is the one who came up with the name.

Howard Stark was also, of course, the founder of HELPING CHILDREN THROUGH RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT.